Participants

Academics

  

Peter B. Reiner 
The organizer of the PWIAS International Roundtable. He is Professor of Psychiatry and co-founder of the National Core for Neuroethics at the University of British Columbia. His research is focused upon the ways in which neurotechnologies impact the quality of our lives. His work in the field neuroessentialism explores notions of legal responsibility, autonomy and decision-making, and stigma. The organizer of the PWIAS International Roundtable. He is Professor of Psychiatry and co-founder of the National Core for Neuroethics at the University of British Columbia. His research is focused upon the ways in which neurotechnologies impact the quality of our lives. His work in the field neuroessentialism explores notions of legal responsibility, autonomy and decision-making, and stigma. 

         C Callison'

Candis Callison 
Assistant Professor at the UBC School of Journalism where she teaches science journalism and media ethics. A member of the Tahltan Nation in northwestern BC, Dr. Callison has worked as a journalist in both Canada and the US, and holds a Ph.D. from the Program in Science, Technology, and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an MSc from MIT’s Comparative Media Studies Program. 

         

Maxwell Cameron 
Professor of Political Science at the University of British Columbia and Director of the Centre for the Study of Democratic Institutions. Dr. Cameron is at work on a book tentatively titled Between Rules and Practice: Why We Need Practical Wisdom in Politics. His work asks what moral skills will we need as citizens, professionals, parents, and friends to know how to act in particular circumstances. 

                

Jennifer Chandler 
Associate Professor of Law at the University of Ottawa, where she teaches mental health law and neuroethics, medical legal issues, tort law, and legal philosophy. Her research focuses on the law and ethics of neuroscience and other advances in biology and medicine. 

 S Heine

Steve Heine
Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of British Columbia. A member of the Centre for Human Evolution, Cognition, and Culture, Dr. Heine’s research on genetic essentialism closely mirrors the aims of the Roundtable insofar as it considers how people understand essences and genetic foundations for human behavior.

 J Illes

Judy Illes
Professor of Neurology and Canada Research Chair in Neuroethics and director of the National Core for Neuroethics at the University of British Columbia. A world leader in the field of neuroethics, Dr. Illes has written extensively on the myriad ways in which neuroscience information is communicated, and mis-communicated, in the popular press. Her most recent edited volume is the Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics.

 N Levy
Neil Levy

Deputy Director (Research) of the Oxford Centre for Neuroethics, and Head of Neuroethics at the Florey Neuroscience Institutes, University of Melbourne. A philosopher with wide ranging interests in neuroethics, Dr. Levy is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Neuroethics and the author of the highly regarded text Neuroethics: Challenges for the 21st Century (2007.)
 S Nagel
Saskia Nagel
Principal Investigator of the research group Changing Brains at the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Osnabrück, and Associate of both the Heidelberg Protestant Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, and the Stiftung Neue Verantwortung. As a cognitive scientist, Dr. Nagel’s interest in the neurosciences focuses on the brain's plasticity and encompasses a range of empirical questions concerning multimodal perception, sleep, sensory substitution, and enhancement. In philosophy, besides interests in philosophy of mind and philosophy of language, Dr. Nagel is mostly concerned with ethical, anthropological, and social investigations with respect to the life sciences, in particular, neuroscience. She asks which understanding of autonomy can be beneficial. She is author of "Ethics and the Neurosciences" (2010). 
 

Jonathan Schooler
Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Schooler's research on human cognition explores topics that intersect philosophy and psychology, such as how fluctuations in people’s awareness of their experience mediate mind-wandering and how exposing individuals to philosophical positions alters their behavior. 

 M Schaller

Mark Schaller
Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of British Columbia. His work in social psychology includes pioneering the dominant evolutionary psychological theory of stigma – that it serves as immunity against social contagion. He is co-author of Evolution, culture, and the human mind (2010).

 E Slingerland

Edward Slingerland
Canada Research Chair in Chinese Thought and Embodied Cognition and Professor in the Department of Asian Studies at UBC, Director of the Cultural Evolution of Religion Research Consortium, and co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Evolution, Cognition and Culture. An expert on embodied cognition as understood through the lens of Chinese religious thought, he is also editor of Creating Consilience: Integrating the Sciences and the Humanities (2010). 

               

Evan Thompson
Professor of of Philosophy at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Thompson's research interests are philosophy of mind and cognitive science, especially embodied cognition and the neuroscience of consciousness; Phenomenology, Continental philosophy of science, and contemporary European philosophy; and cross-cultural philosophy, especially Indian philosophical traditions and contemporary Buddhist philosophy in dialogue with Western philosophy of mind and cognitive science.

 L Whiteley

Louise Whiteley
Associate Professor at Medical Museion, University of Copenhagen. Dr. Whiteley studies how neuroscientific research is entangled with popular culture; from newspaper headlines that over-extrapolate laboratory research, to the use of brain scan images in advertising or the uptake of scientific vocabularies into everyday speech and ways of thinking about the self. She also produces public engagement events.

 

Authors and Artists

 Sarah Chase

Sarah Chase
A British Columbia-based, internationally recognized choreographer, dancer and storyteller. Sarah generates choreographic equations through a type of exercise known as cross patterning, sets of movements that challenge both hemispheres of the brain simultaneously. Among her many her works is Number Theory, which she will adapt for this roundtable and present at the public performance. 

 G Frazzetto

Giovanni Frazzetto
Giovanni Frazzetto was born and grew up on the east coast of Sicily. In 1995, after high school, he moved to the UK to study science at University College London and in 2002 he received a PhD from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg. Since he was a student he has worked and written on the relationship between science, society and culture, publishing in journals such as EMBOreports and Nature.
He was one of the founders of the European Neuroscience & Society Network and the creator of the transdisciplinary Neuroschools. Giovanni has also written short stories and plays and curated science-inspired art exhibitions.
For his transdisciplinary efforts he was awarded the 2008 John Kendrew Young Scientist Award. He now lives between London and Berlin where he works at the Institute for Advanced Study. His first book 'How We Feel- What Neuroscience Can -and Can't- tell us about our emotions' was published in August 2013.